That’s A Wrap! (+ Vintage Simplicity 4130 Review and BONUS review by Gussets and Godets)

I really have been sewing too much for my own good right now. I have a backlist of posts and pattern reviews to write about the plethora of blouses that I’ve made of late. I hope you like vintage blouses cause… you’ll be gettin’ a lot of ’em!

S4130

Today I’m blogging about my experience with vintage Simplicity 4130, lent to me by my vintage sewing BFF Rachel. A call back to my dancing days, I love a good wrap top for their ballerina-like beauty and their ability to instantly emphasize the figure. This one, made up in a gold-flecked cranberry knit, certainly fulfills those expectations!

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The pattern went together quickly and easily, which is a testament to an early 60s pattern. Things started to get a lot simpler in the sewing pattern world at this time — I’m talking printed patterns and instructions that don’t assume you already know everything about the sewing process.

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As vintage patterns, like their modern counterparts, are known for having ease, PARTICULARLY in the bust, a size 32 seemed perfect for my 34-35″ bustline. I wasn’t disappointed, and this pattern went together perfectly with little need to alter. Part of that is due to the nature of a wrap top, and that’s the beauty of the thing — you don’t HAVE to be perfect at fitting with a wrap top. Highly recommended for a beginning seamstress!

I made a couple minor alterations to the pattern since it’s made for a woven fabric and I used a knit. I simply removed the seam allowance (to account for my fabric’s stretch) and ignored the facings in exchange for a simple turned over hem. Easy as pie.

My FAVORITE part about this pattern? It’s reversible! I can get two looks out of one: a traditional cross-front wrap, or a sultry high-necked, low-back stunner. What more can you ask for?

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If you’re searching for a similar look, Butterick offers B6285, one of Gertie’s patterns. Though I haven’t used it, the pattern looks very similar to mine and it looks beautiful made up. I asked Christina of Gussets and Godets to write a quick review of B6285 for comparison. I think her top turned out beautifully!

This was my first experience of sewing with knits, and I’m not sure why I have never sewn with knits before. I don’t have a special machine for sewing knits, but this wrap top is super cute and I knew I could easily incorporate this into my wardrobe.

The pattern consists of only 2 pieces. One body piece and one for the waist ties. It is a very cleverly cut top and sews up so quickly because there are so few seams. I like that there is no shoulder seam or armhole to fiddle with, the dolman sleeve is sleek and smooth.

Instructions were very clear and easy to follow. Though they assume you know what you are doing so they don’t give any hints and tips on how to sew with jersey which would have been useful. Gertie published a tutorial post on her blog with step by step instruction, photos and advice which I found very helpful and is a nice resource to check if you are unsure of a step.

I sized down one size based on the measurements on the pattern envelope from my recommended size 18 to the 16 and it was definitely the right size for me. It is a very forgiving garment being a jersey wrap so if you are quite busty or flatter chested the fabric will stretch or mold to the body.

From my experience of sewing this knitted top, I can advise that using a ball point needle is a must! A slightly looser tension than for woven fabrics helps avoid snapped stitches when wearing your top and also on any areas under strain.

My verdict: I really love this top! It is so versatile and allows me to wear my pretty cotton summer dresses while still covering up my arms and back in the colder weather. Dress it up or down and it’s super elegant and comfortable! Overall a nice easy project, I didn’t get stuck or confused during the sewing and it was a nice quick make.

 

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Thanks to Christina, it seems like B6285 is a great alternative if you can’t find the vintage Simplicity 4130! Butterick is easy to find and the look is so close to my vintage pattern, except it has vertical darting instead of Simplicity’s pretty 45 degree angle darts. Additionally, B6285 is not MADE to be reversible, but I suspect it can be worn backwards if you wish. I put on a non-reversible Ralph Lauren wrap top I own backwards, and it worked just fine.

As my grandma says about cooking (via Emeril): there’s no kitchen police! And as I say… there’s no sewing police! If you want to change something up, do so. The pattern won’t turn you in. Wear that B6285 (or other wrap pattern) backwards if you want! Feel free to use a knit instead of a woven (with simple adjustments). Sewing is what you make of it, and that’s the beauty of the thing.

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In summary (TLDR):

  • Simplicity pros = made to be reversible, lovely 45 degree darts. Made for woven fabrics.
  • Simplicity cons = hard-to-find pattern and only sold, as all vintage patterns, one size at a time.
  • Butterick pros = easy access, very similar look, patterned specifically for knit fabric.
  • Butterick cons = not made to be reversible (though likely can be worn backwards), boring vertical darting (lol).

 

Are you fearless with your sewing or refashions? What kind of adjustments have you made to clothing you own that it wasn’t intended for (like wearing something backwards)?

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Until next time,

Lauren || The Homemade Pinup

P.S. Remember that I have a Pinterest JUST for vintage style inspiration, organized by decade AND garment type! My Instagram is always a great place to follow my day-to-day happenings and outfits. And though it’s brand-new, I also have a Twitter that I will be using to update on new posts! Thanks for following, darlings!

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14 thoughts on “That’s A Wrap! (+ Vintage Simplicity 4130 Review and BONUS review by Gussets and Godets)

  1. Lovely blouse, Lauren! I have a vintage-style dress that I wear backwards. It’s too deep in the neckline for my comfort, so I just flip it around and wear a cardigan over it so you can’t see the blousiness in the back. Doing stuff like that, as you’ve shown with this blouse, gives you twice as many ways to wear a piece!

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  2. My favourite piece of sewing advice comes from an older dressmaking book: the right way is the way that works. I keep that phrase in mind whenever I’m sewing and it’s wonderful the way it removes any pressure and replaces it with a bit of fun and sewing experimentation. And, as you say, there are no sewing police!

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  3. I made up the Butterick pattern, and just wanted to add a note. It works best with lightweight knits. I used a medium weight knit jersey and the ties were very heavy. The bodice rode up and the ties rode down. I added loops to run the ties through and it was still a no go. Having said that, I must add that it is a very interesting pattern and was fun to sew. I am tempted to try it again after seeing Christina’s cute version.

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  4. Once again the vintage patterns win with their well placed darts and clever details. Although modern patterns can be a good substitute, they just can’t match the attention to detail. And incredible you can wear the vintage top backwards, just fantastic. Thank you for including my opinion sweetie.

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    • Thank you! The color is what drew me to this fabric, as I would never choose a knit otherwise. My slacks are vintage US Navy pants that I bought at my local Army/Navy surplus store for pennies. A lucky find!!

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